FAQ

 

1.General

1.1.Can I tour your facility?

1.2. Is Moller International stock publicly traded?

1.3. I have a great idea. Can I mail my drawings and a description of my idea to Dr. Moller for his opinion? Can I call to discuss my invention with Dr. Moller?

2.Aerobot

2.1.Can I buy an Aerobot?

3.Rotapower Engine

3.1.What Rotapower models will be available?

3.2.Do you have a Freedom Motor I can buy for testing or can I special order one for my own projects?

3.3.Can I purchase Rotapower engines for homebuilt aircraft?

3.4.Can I put a Rotapower Engine in my car?

3.5.The page listing Rotapower Engine Performance Advantages states "power output/weight greater than 2 HP/lb.," yet the gasoline engine comparison lists the 150 HP Rotapower engine with a weight of 135 lbs.Why?

4.M400 Skycar

4.1.When will the M400 be available?

4.2.Why is it taking so long to complete the Skycar?

4.3.How much will the M400 cost?

4.4.Do you have a showroom?

4.5.Can I buy a Skycar model/kit?

4.6.Will the M400 be expensive to maintain/use?

4.7.Will the added air traffic create more air pollution?

4.8.Does this mean the traffic/congestion would just be in the sky instead of the ground?

4.9.With added traffic in the sky, how will we keep the airways safe?

4.10.How do you plan to prevent your planes from running into each other inthe sky?

4.11.How suited is the Skycar to taxiing and does it require special roads?

4.12.Are there limitations to using the Skycar for ground travel?

4.13.Where will the Skycar be permitted to take off and land?

4.14.Will the M400 be capable of remote location landings?

4.15.When will the M400 be pressurized?

4.16.Does the M400 float?

4.17.What happens if there is an engine failure? Would the M400 still fly?

4.18.Is there a computerized weight control so overloading is impossible?

4.19.Where do you put the shopping?

4.20.The Insurance costs for the M400?

4.21.Will I need a license to pilot an M400 Skycar?

4.22.How can I obtain a video of the M400 Skycar?

4.23.Do you offer a screensaver program with graphic images of hundreds ofSkycars in the sky?

4.24.What about the Skycar Volantor's High Disc Loading?

4.25.Doesn't the new folding-wing design of the M400 preclude its ever becoming a "roadable" vehicle (one that can be driven to and from the local helipad), or was roadability never seriously considered?

4.26.Will Moller International offer more than one model of the Skycar?

4.27.In your latest photographs and video clips of the M400 it looks like the nacelles rotate. Is this something new to the Skycar?

4.28.How is the Skycar powered on the ground? Does it use thrust from the nacelles or do the wheels have a direct drive of some kind?

4.29.Why don’t you see if a company with a big budget for advertising would sponsor the untethered and manned demonstration flight of the Skycar?

4.30.Why is the Terrafugia classified as a Light Sport Aircraft and the Skycar is not?

 

1. General

1.1. Can I tour your facility?

Tours of the Moller International facility will restart again soon. Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. regarding the schedule and availability.

1.2.Is Moller International stock publicly traded?

Yes, see our Investment page or any broker familiar with Over-The-Counter transactions.

1.3. I have a great idea. Can I mail my drawings and a description of my idea to Dr. Moller for his opinion? Can I call to discuss my invention with Dr. Moller?

Unfortunately we are not able to discuss or review concepts, help develop material or assist with the preparation of information for a patent. Our focus is on technology that applies strictly to our products, most of which is internally developed and requires all of our resources. If you have a patent on Skycar or engine-related technology, please feel free to send us the US Patent Number and issue date plus a brief description. If we feel the patent may be applicable we will independently review. If you have an un-patented invention or concept, please get it patented before you attempt to contact us. Any preliminary materials will be destroyed upon receipt, and we do not discuss these matters on the phone or in person.

 

2.Aerobot

2.1.Can I buy an Aerobot?

We are currently under contract to continue development of various Aerobots designed exclusively for specialized functions. We have not yet looked into production opportunities for this device.

 

3.Rotapower Engine

3.1.What Rotapower models will be available?

The Rotapower engine is being offered by our sister company, Freedom Motors, in two sizes initially; a single-rotor 650cc (75 hp) and a twin-rotor 1300cc (150 hp) version. Details are available at www.Freedom-Motors.com.

3.2.Do you have a Freedom Motor I can buy for testing or can I special order one for my own projects?

Yes, we have licensed production of the Rotapower engine to Freedom Motors and they are taking orders for the 650cc and 1300cc models now. See www.Freedom-Motors.com for more information.

3.3.Can I purchase Rotapower engines for homebuilt aircraft?

Due to liability concerns, MI doesn't plan to initially sell engines for aircraft. A number of interested parties plan to market marine engines with aviation conversion kits and thereby assume the liability. When the engine becomes publicly available, information on Rotapower distributors will be posted on our web page.

3.4.Can I put a Rotapower Engine in my car?

The current model is not intended for use in automotive applications.

3.5.The page listing Rotapower Engine Performance Advantages states "power output/weight greater than 2 HP/lb.," yet the gasoline engine comparison lists the 150 HP Rotapower engine with a weight of 135 lbs. Why?

We have achieved 2.5 HP/lb. in the lab with our special high performance model. The 150 HP version is a de-rated marine engine. This number is close to that for a production engine -- in an application for long life.

 

4.M400 Skycar

4.1.When will the M400 be available?

Limited numbers are expected to be available within the next three years. These will be used for marketing demonstrators, special sales, and military applications. A FAA certified model is more than four years away. We already have over 100 reservations for the FAA certified models. The timing of the models available to the public will depend on the speed of the government in certifying the vehicle as airworthy. Moller has little or no control in this process.

4.2.Why is it taking so long to complete the Skycar?

Revolutionary ideas are not born overnight. We have been in development since the 1960's and have flown several prototypes and concept vehicles. The progress of the M400 is on a very quick schedule when you review the man-hours and dollars expended. Only $100 Million has been spent in R & D at Moller International, compare this to the $1.2 Billion required for the gearbox design on the Bell-Boeing V22 Osprey.

4.3.How much will the M400 cost?

In limited production (500 units per year) the M400 Skycar will sell for a price comparable to that of a four-passenger high performance helicopter or airplane, approximately $500,000. As the volume of production increases substantially, its price can approach that of a quality automobile ($60,000-$80,000).

4.4.Do you have a showroom?

Not at this time.

4.5. Can I buy a Skycar model/kit?

A limited number of model Skycars are available for sale. We offer a 1/38th scale model of the M400 along with other branded merchandise. Please give us a call to check on availability and pricing.

4.6.Will the M400 be expensive to maintain/use?

With very few moving parts the M400's Rotapower ® engines require little maintenance. Also the Rotapower engine has the unique capability of burning a variety of fuels - thus making it affordable to operate regardless of which liquid fuels are readily available in your area.

4.7.Will the added air traffic create more air pollution?

a) Most automotive pollution occurs at idle or low speed; the Skycar does not need to idle and at low speed the engines are still working hard enough to burn the fuel completely.

b) By travelling five times faster than the automobile the Skycar spends less time producing emissions for the same distance travelled.

c) We expect to generally fuel the Skycar with alcohol (a much cleaner fuel) when it becomes readily available in the next few years.

4.8.Does this mean the traffic/congestion would just be in the sky instead of the ground?

No. Airspace is usable in 3-dimensions, and provides us with more flexibility than ground transportation that can use only surface area. Our view is that you would have layers of air traffic and whenever one altitude became over crowded another would be utilized. To give you an idea of how this would work, image that each car on road today were turned into a Skycar and put into the air using this new system, then each Skycar in the sky would still be over a mile apart in all directions!

4.9.With added traffic in the sky, how will we keep the airways safe?

The FAA and NASA are studying a system to manage air traffic for smaller aircraft. In conjunction with this new "flight control" for all aircraft, current systems such as GPS and TCAS will also be utilized by the M400. In addition, prior to M400 production, it is expected that technological advancements will allow for increased flight safety by relying on additional systems such as advanced computerized transponder signal relays, pre-programmed flight plans, and nearby traffic display.

4.10.How do you plan to prevent your planes from running into each other in the sky?

Ultimately, the airway network will direct all Skycars in such a manner that, while traveling in a specific direction on a designated computer controlled airway, they will all be going at the same speed and be automatically separated from one another.

4.11.How suited is the Skycar to taxiing and does it require special roads?

It will taxi; however, it was engineered for ground travel only as is required to travel from your home to its point of take-off and back. The top ground speed will be 30-35 miles per hour. It does not require special roads.

4.12.Are there limitations to using the Skycar for ground travel?

The M400 was engineered to meet the size and other requirements set forth by the DOT and will be "street legal" primarily because it can be treated under the same category as a three-wheeled motorcycle. It should be noted that Skycar was developed for short distance ground travel at low speeds as a means to conveniently transport it from storage locations to approved take-off locations and back.

4.13.Where will the Skycar be permitted to take off and land?

At this time, "power-lift" aircraft are authorized for take-off and landing only from airports and heliports as defined by the FAA. We expect that with the success of the M400,additional locations (vertiports) will be approved specifically to accommodate this mode of transportation. Possible candidates for vertiport sites may include small sections of local parking lots,fields and private properties that fit the specifications for space and noise requirements by the FAA.

4.14.Will the M400 be capable of remote location landings?

Yes but as with any VTOL aircraft, it needs a stable surface such as pavement, grass or hard clay for take-off and landing. Don't forget M400 must also adhere to all FAA regulations for this type of aircraft.

4.15.When will the M400 be pressurized?

Yes, at some point. This vehicle is capable of travel at 30,000 feet and therefore requires pressurization to operate above 12,000 feet.

4.16.Does the M400 float?

It can be adapted for water operation.

4.17.What happens if there is an engine failure? Would the M400 still fly?

All of our M400 Skycar vital systems have redundant back-up including flight control, navigation, engines, etc. As long as both engines in the same duct do not fail, the Skycar can be landed at a convenient airport. With multi-engine failure (like multiple bird ingestion) the system can be maneuvered to a suitable site to deploy the parachutes.

4.18.Is there a computerized weight control so overloading is impossible?

Yes. Strain gauges at the wheels will ensure that the maximum weight is not exceeded and that the weight distribution is correct.

4.19. Where do you put the shopping?

The production version of the M400 will have space for storage inside the cabin and a forward storage hatch. Again, the M400 was designed to transport passengers safely and efficiently and was not engineered for large cargo. In addition to the front hatch, you can also make use of the substantial area behind the rear seat.

4.20. The Insurance costs for the M400?

We are currently working with the insurance industry regarding this issue.

4.21.Will I need a license to pilot an M400 Skycar?

Currently the Skycar is categorized as a "powered-lift normal" aircraft by the FAA. This means that, yes, you will require a "powered-lift normal" category pilot's license to operate a Skycar. However, it is our intention that the volantor will eventually evolve into a completely automated form of transportation making you a passenger - not a pilot/driver. At that point, no pilot's license would be required as long as you operate within this control network.

4.22.How can I obtain a video of the M400 Skycar?

We do not have videos for sale at the present time.

For press only: You can obtain a BETACAM SP tape with flight/hover footage of the M400 and M200X by calling us at 530-756-5086. There is a required $25 refundable deposit.

4.23.Do you offer a screensaver program with graphic images of hundreds of Skycars in the sky?

The Skycar screensaver is currently unavailable. We are working on producing a new screensaver with the current M400 model.

4.24.What about the Skycar Volantor's High Disc Loading?

High disc loading (up to a point of course) leads to higher propulsive efficiency at higher speeds. For example, typical tilt-rotor aircraft (V22, BA609) has a disc loading of less than 50 lbs./ft2 compared to 150 lbs/ft2 for the M400. The V22 should be 75 miles per hour slower than the M400, based on the historic relationship between speed and disc-loading, but by using more power in cruise than in hover it is able to approach the M400's cruise speed. However the V22 can only accomplish this by burning over three times as much fuel per passenger mile in cruise. The volantor's higher disc loading with its small efficient ducted fans account for this reduced fuel consumption.

4.25.Doesn't the new folding-wing design of the M400 preclude its ever becoming a "roadable" vehicle (one that can be driven to and from the local helipad), or was roadability never seriously considered?

On the contrary, the previous version width was slightly over 10 feet, while the folded wing version is configured at 8 1/2 feet. This is within the current width limits without any exemption. Roadability and containerized shipping were both considerations for this design. In addition to the more compact design, the aircraft now gets about double the fuel economy of the previous version. These improvements are due to its increased wing surface and better lift-to-drag ratio.

4.26.Will Moller International offer more than one model of the Skycar?

MI has looked at models ranging in size from single person to six-passenger. The final decision on which model(s) go into production will depend on demand. Right now it appears that the highest demand for a near-term product may be from the military. Their interest in a higher payload capacity vehicle than our M400 (750 lbs.) may move us towards the M600 (six passenger model with crew and/or cargo of ~1,500 lbs.) The M600's configuration is approximately the same as the latest M400 design, only about 20% bigger and is at the limits of what we believe our style of ducted-fan VTOL can handle.

4.27.In your latest photographs and video clips of the M400 it looks like the nacelles rotate. Is this something new to the Skycar?

Yes, the nacelle rotation is a new feature. The rotation through approximately 45°, in combination with the vane deflection system provides very efficient vertical thrust for vertical takeoff, landing and hovering. As forward speed increases the nacelles will rotate from their initial position to horizontal followed by reducing the vane deflection from 45° to near 0°. Since the nacelles reach the horizontal position at relatively low forward speed, leading edge lip stall (flow separation) is prevented.

4.28.How is the Skycar powered on the ground? Does it use thrust from the nacelles or do the wheels have a direct drive of some kind?

Current plans call for one engine to provide electrical power to motors in the drive wheels. Alternatively, one engine could provide sufficient thrust for ground propulsion as a backup to the electric drive.

4.29.Why don’t you see if a company with a big budget for advertising would sponsor the untethered and manned demonstration flight of the Skycar?

We agree that with the astronomical advertising budgets that seem to be available for products like sports drinks, football games, auto racing, etc that it would be a "no brainer" to slice off a small chunk for the Skycar. The potential publicly could be enormous! We now have well over 750 members of the domestic and international news media who have requested to attend a demonstration flight of the Skycar. The coverage available to a sponsor of such an event would be close to that obtained by sponsors of the Olympics or other such international events. Anyone interested in becoming a sponsor is encouraged to contact us for further details.

4.30.Why is the Terrafugia classified as a Light Sport Aircraft and the Skycar is not?

The Light Sport Aircraft (SLA) category is indeed not the appropriate category for the Skycar. Terrafugia's recently received exception to the 1,200 weight classification will allow them to certify in this category, but it won't get them the Department of Transportation waivers they will need to effectively drive on public roads. Because they are a four-wheeled vehicle, the rigorous requirements for crash protection apply to their vehicle, but if they try to comply with these requirements I believe the additional weight will make their aircraft's performance very poor. Lastly, the Terrafugia is not VTOL and therefore will have to travel considerable distances on the road, perhaps even on highways, to get to and from an airport.

Because the Skycar uses a three-wheeled undercarriage it is not currently required to meet the same standards as a four-wheeled road vehicle. Our design's center of gravity is well balanced on a tricycle landing gear, whereas the Terrafugia's design cannot. Our intent is to register under the three-wheeled vehicle safety standards, similar to those used for a motorcycle or utility vehicle, which do not require air-bags, crumple zones, etc. Additionally, we do not envision the need to drive the Skycar great distances or at high-speeds as we are VTOL capable and can land and takeoff much closer to one's home or destination.

 

1.General

1.1.Can I tour your facility?

1.2. Is Moller International stock publicly traded?

1.3. I have a great idea. Can I mail my drawings and a description of my idea to Dr. Moller for his opinion? Can I call to discuss my invention with Dr. Moller?

2.Aerobot

2.1.Can I buy an Aerobot?

3.Rotapower Engine

3.1.What Rotapower models will be available?

3.2.Do you have a Freedom Motor I can buy for testing or can I special order one for my own projects?

3.3.Can I purchase Rotapower engines for homebuilt aircraft?

3.4.Can I put a Rotapower Engine in my car?

3.5.The page listing Rotapower Engine Performance Advantages states "power output/weight greater than 2 HP/lb.," yet the gasoline engine comparison lists the 150 HP Rotapower engine with a weight of 135 lbs.Why?

4.M400 Skycar

4.1.When will the M400 be available?

4.2.Why is it taking so long to complete the Skycar?

4.3.How much will the M400 cost?

4.4.Do you have a showroom?

4.5.Can I buy a Skycar model/kit?

4.6.Will the M400 be expensive to maintain/use?

4.7.Will the added air traffic create more air pollution?

4.8.Does this mean the traffic/congestion would just be in the sky instead of the ground?

4.9.With added traffic in the sky, how will we keep the airways safe?

4.10.How do you plan to prevent your planes from running into each other inthe sky?

4.11.How suited is the Skycar to taxiing and does it require special roads?

4.12.Are there limitations to using the Skycar for ground travel?

4.13.Where will the Skycar be permitted to take off and land?

4.14.Will the M400 be capable of remote location landings?

4.15.When will the M400 be pressurized?

4.16.Does the M400 float?

4.17.What happens if there is an engine failure? Would the M400 still fly?

4.18.Is there a computerized weight control so overloading is impossible?

4.19.Where do you put the shopping?

4.20.The Insurance costs for the M400?

4.21.Will I need a license to pilot an M400 Skycar?

4.22.How can I obtain a video of the M400 Skycar?

4.23.Do you offer a screensaver program with graphic images of hundreds ofSkycars in the sky?

4.24.What about the Skycar Volantor's High Disc Loading?

4.25.Doesn't the new folding-wing design of the M400 preclude its ever becoming a "roadable" vehicle (one that can be driven to and from the local helipad), or was roadability never seriously considered?

4.26.Will Moller International offer more than one model of the Skycar?

4.27.In your latest photographs and video clips of the M400 it looks like the nacelles rotate. Is this something new to the Skycar?

4.28.How is the Skycar powered on the ground? Does it use thrust from the nacelles or do the wheels have a direct drive of some kind?

4.29.Why don’t you see if a company with a big budget for advertising would sponsor the untethered and manned demonstration flight of the Skycar?

4.30.Why is the Terrafugia classified as a Light Sport Aircraft and the Skycar is not?

 

1. General

1.1. Can I tour your facility?

Tours of the Moller International facility will restart again soon. Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. regarding the schedule and availability.

1.2.Is Moller International stock publicly traded?

Yes, see our Investment page or any broker familiar with Over-The-Counter transactions.

1.3. I have a great idea. Can I mail my drawings and a description of my idea to Dr. Moller for his opinion? Can I call to discuss my invention with Dr. Moller?

Unfortunately we are not able to discuss or review concepts, help develop material or assist with the preparation of information for a patent. Our focus is on technology that applies strictly to our products, most of which is internally developed and requires all of our resources. If you have a patent on Skycar or engine-related technology, please feel free to send us the US Patent Number and issue date plus a brief description. If we feel the patent may be applicable we will independently review. If you have an un-patented invention or concept, please get it patented before you attempt to contact us. Any preliminary materials will be destroyed upon receipt, and we do not discuss these matters on the phone or in person.

 

2.Aerobot

2.1.Can I buy an Aerobot?

We are currently under contract to continue development of various Aerobots designed exclusively for specialized functions. We have not yet looked into production opportunities for this device.

 

3.Rotapower Engine

3.1.What Rotapower models will be available?

The Rotapower engine is being offered by our sister company, Freedom Motors, in two sizes initially; a single-rotor 650cc (75 hp) and a twin-rotor 1300cc (150 hp) version. Details are available at www.Freedom-Motors.com.

3.2.Do you have a Freedom Motor I can buy for testing or can I special order one for my own projects?

Yes, we have licensed production of the Rotapower engine to Freedom Motors and they are taking orders for the 650cc and 1300cc models now. See www.Freedom-Motors.com for more information.

3.3.Can I purchase Rotapower engines for homebuilt aircraft?

Due to liability concerns, MI doesn't plan to initially sell engines for aircraft. A number of interested parties plan to market marine engines with aviation conversion kits and thereby assume the liability. When the engine becomes publicly available, information on Rotapower distributors will be posted on our web page.

3.4.Can I put a Rotapower Engine in my car?

The current model is not intended for use in automotive applications.

3.5.The page listing Rotapower Engine Performance Advantages states "power output/weight greater than 2 HP/lb.," yet the gasoline engine comparison lists the 150 HP Rotapower engine with a weight of 135 lbs. Why?

We have achieved 2.5 HP/lb. in the lab with our special high performance model. The 150 HP version is a de-rated marine engine. This number is close to that for a production engine -- in an application for long life.

 

4.M400 Skycar

4.1.When will the M400 be available?

Limited numbers are expected to be available within the next three years. These will be used for marketing demonstrators, special sales, and military applications. A FAA certified model is more than four years away. We already have over 100 reservations for the FAA certified models. The timing of the models available to the public will depend on the speed of the government in certifying the vehicle as airworthy. Moller has little or no control in this process.

4.2.Why is it taking so long to complete the Skycar?

Revolutionary ideas are not born overnight. We have been in development since the 1960's and have flown several prototypes and concept vehicles. The progress of the M400 is on a very quick schedule when you review the man-hours and dollars expended. Only $100 Million has been spent in R & D at Moller International, compare this to the $1.2 Billion required for the gearbox design on the Bell-Boeing V22 Osprey.

4.3.How much will the M400 cost?

In limited production (500 units per year) the M400 Skycar will sell for a price comparable to that of a four-passenger high performance helicopter or airplane, approximately $500,000. As the volume of production increases substantially, its price can approach that of a quality automobile ($60,000-$80,000).

4.4.Do you have a showroom?

Not at this time.

4.5. Can I buy a Skycar model/kit?

Model Skycars are available for sale on our web site. We offer a 1/38th scale model of the M400 along with other branded merchandise. Please browse our merchandise area for details.

4.6.Will the M400 be expensive to maintain/use?

With very few moving parts the M400's Rotapower ® engines require little maintenance. Also the Rotapower engine has the unique capability of burning a variety of fuels - thus making it affordable to operate regardless of which liquid fuels are readily available in your area.

4.7.Will the added air traffic create more air pollution?

a) Most automotive pollution occurs at idle or low speed; the Skycar does not need to idle and at low speed the engines are still working hard enough to burn the fuel completely.

b) By travelling five times faster than the automobile the Skycar spends less time producing emissions for the same distance travelled.

c) We expect to generally fuel the Skycar with alcohol (a much cleaner fuel) when it becomes readily available in the next few years.

4.8.Does this mean the traffic/congestion would just be in the sky instead of the ground?

No. Airspace is usable in 3-dimensions, and provides us with more flexibility than ground transportation that can use only surface area. Our view is that you would have layers of air traffic and whenever one altitude became over crowded another would be utilized. To give you an idea of how this would work, image that each car on road today were turned into a Skycar and put into the air using this new system, then each Skycar in the sky would still be over a mile apart in all directions!

4.9.With added traffic in the sky, how will we keep the airways safe?

The FAA and NASA are studying a system to manage air traffic for smaller aircraft. In conjunction with this new "flight control" for all aircraft, current systems such as GPS and TCAS will also be utilized by the M400. In addition, prior to M400 production, it is expected that technological advancements will allow for increased flight safety by relying on additional systems such as advanced computerized transponder signal relays, pre-programmed flight plans, and nearby traffic display.

4.10.How do you plan to prevent your planes from running into each other in the sky?

Ultimately, the airway network will direct all Skycars in such a manner that, while traveling in a specific direction on a designated computer controlled airway, they will all be going at the same speed and be automatically separated from one another.

4.11.How suited is the Skycar to taxiing and does it require special roads?

It will taxi; however, it was engineered for ground travel only as is required to travel from your home to its point of take-off and back. The top ground speed will be 30-35 miles per hour. It does not require special roads.

4.12.Are there limitations to using the Skycar for ground travel?

The M400 was engineered to meet the size and other requirements set forth by the DOT and will be "street legal" primarily because it can be treated under the same category as a three-wheeled motorcycle. It should be noted that Skycar was developed for short distance ground travel at low speeds as a means to conveniently transport it from storage locations to approved take-off locations and back.

4.13.Where will the Skycar be permitted to take off and land?

At this time, "power-lift" aircraft are authorized for take-off and landing only from airports and heliports as defined by the FAA. We expect that with the success of the M400,additional locations (vertiports) will be approved specifically to accommodate this mode of transportation. Possible candidates for vertiport sites may include small sections of local parking lots,fields and private properties that fit the specifications for space and noise requirements by the FAA.

4.14.Will the M400 be capable of remote location landings?

Yes but as with any VTOL aircraft, it needs a stable surface such as pavement, grass or hard clay for take-off and landing. Don't forget M400 must also adhere to all FAA regulations for this type of aircraft.

4.15.When will the M400 be pressurized?

Yes, at some point. This vehicle is capable of travel at 30,000 feet and therefore requires pressurization to operate above 12,000 feet.

4.16.Does the M400 float?

It can be adapted for water operation.

4.17.What happens if there is an engine failure? Would the M400 still fly?

All of our M400 Skycar vital systems have redundant back-up including flight control, navigation, engines, etc. As long as both engines in the same duct do not fail, the Skycar can be landed at a convenient airport. With multi-engine failure (like multiple bird ingestion) the system can be maneuvered to a suitable site to deploy the parachutes.

4.18.Is there a computerized weight control so overloading is impossible?

Yes. Strain gauges at the wheels will ensure that the maximum weight is not exceeded and that the weight distribution is correct.

4.19. Where do you put the shopping?

The production version of the M400 will have space for storage inside the cabin and a forward storage hatch. Again, the M400 was designed to transport passengers safely and efficiently and was not engineered for large cargo. In addition to the front hatch, you can also make use of the substantial area behind the rear seat.

4.20. The Insurance costs for the M400?

We are currently working with the insurance industry regarding this issue.

4.21.Will I need a license to pilot an M400 Skycar?

Currently the Skycar is categorized as a "powered-lift normal" aircraft by the FAA. This means that, yes, you will require a "powered-lift normal" category pilot's license to operate a Skycar. However, it is our intention that the volantor will eventually evolve into a completely automated form of transportation making you a passenger - not a pilot/driver. At that point, no pilot's license would be required as long as you operate within this control network.

4.22.How can I obtain a video of the M400 Skycar?

We do not have videos for sale at the present time.

For press only: You can obtain a BETACAM SP tape with flight/hover footage of the M400 and M200X by calling us at 530-756-5086. There is a required $25 refundable deposit.

4.23.Do you offer a screensaver program with graphic images of hundreds of Skycars in the sky?

The Skycar screensaver is currently unavailable. We are working on producing a new screensaver with the current M400 model.

4.24.What about the Skycar Volantor's High Disc Loading?

High disc loading (up to a point of course) leads to higher propulsive efficiency at higher speeds. For example, typical tilt-rotor aircraft (V22, BA609) has a disc loading of less than 50 lbs./ft2 compared to 150 lbs/ft2 for the M400. The V22 should be 75 miles per hour slower than the M400, based on the historic relationship between speed and disc-loading, but by using more power in cruise than in hover it is able to approach the M400's cruise speed. However the V22 can only accomplish this by burning over three times as much fuel per passenger mile in cruise. The volantor's higher disc loading with its small efficient ducted fans account for this reduced fuel consumption.

4.25.Doesn't the new folding-wing design of the M400 preclude its ever becoming a "roadable" vehicle (one that can be driven to and from the local helipad), or was roadability never seriously considered?

On the contrary, the previous version width was slightly over 10 feet, while the folded wing version is configured at 8 1/2 feet. This is within the current width limits without any exemption. Roadability and containerized shipping were both considerations for this design. In addition to the more compact design, the aircraft now gets about double the fuel economy of the previous version. These improvements are due to its increased wing surface and better lift-to-drag ratio.

4.26.Will Moller International offer more than one model of the Skycar?

MI has looked at models ranging in size from single person to six-passenger. The final decision on which model(s) go into production will depend on demand. Right now it appears that the highest demand for a near-term product may be from the military. Their interest in a higher payload capacity vehicle than our M400 (750 lbs.) may move us towards the M600 (six passenger model with crew and/or cargo of ~1,500 lbs.) The M600's configuration is approximately the same as the latest M400 design, only about 20% bigger and is at the limits of what we believe our style of ducted-fan VTOL can handle.

4.27.In your latest photographs and video clips of the M400 it looks like the nacelles rotate. Is this something new to the Skycar?

Yes, the nacelle rotation is a new feature. The rotation through approximately 45°, in combination with the vane deflection system provides very efficient vertical thrust for vertical takeoff, landing and hovering. As forward speed increases the nacelles will rotate from their initial position to horizontal followed by reducing the vane deflection from 45° to near 0°. Since the nacelles reach the horizontal position at relatively low forward speed, leading edge lip stall (flow separation) is prevented.

4.28.How is the Skycar powered on the ground? Does it use thrust from the nacelles or do the wheels have a direct drive of some kind?

Current plans call for one engine to provide electrical power to motors in the drive wheels. Alternatively, one engine could provide sufficient thrust for ground propulsion as a backup to the electric drive.

4.29.Why don’t you see if a company with a big budget for advertising would sponsor the untethered and manned demonstration flight of the Skycar?

We agree that with the astronomical advertising budgets that seem to be available for products like sports drinks, football games, auto racing, etc that it would be a "no brainer" to slice off a small chunk for the Skycar. The potential publicly could be enormous! We now have well over 750 members of the domestic and international news media who have requested to attend a demonstration flight of the Skycar. The coverage available to a sponsor of such an event would be close to that obtained by sponsors of the Olympics or other such international events. Anyone interested in becoming a sponsor is encouraged to contact us for further details.

4.30.Why is the Terrafugia classified as a Light Sport Aircraft and the Skycar is not?

The Light Sport Aircraft (SLA) category is indeed not the appropriate category for the Skycar. Terrafugia's recently received exception to the 1,200 weight classification will allow them to certify in this category, but it won't get them the Department of Transportation waivers they will need to effectively drive on public roads. Because they are a four-wheeled vehicle, the rigorous requirements for crash protection apply to their vehicle, but if they try to comply with these requirements I believe the additional weight will make their aircraft's performance very poor. Lastly, the Terrafugia is not VTOL and therefore will have to travel considerable distances on the road, perhaps even on highways, to get to and from an airport.

Because the Skycar uses a three-wheeled undercarriage it is not currently required to meet the same standards as a four-wheeled road vehicle. Our design's center of gravity is well balanced on a tricycle landing gear, whereas the Terrafugia's design cannot. Our intent is to register under the three-wheeled vehicle safety standards, similar to those used for a motorcycle or utility vehicle, which do not require air-bags, crumple zones, etc. Additionally, we do not envision the need to drive the Skycar great distances or at high-speeds as we are VTOL capable and can land and takeoff much closer to one's home or destination.